Thursday, December 25, 2008

On "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button"

From The Dispatch:
There is something deeply touching about the tale of Benjamin Button, its profound universality and the idea that even in our old age, we all end up as children. The intersecting lives of Benjamin and Daisy provide the perfect backdrop for a powerful meditation on life and the nature of love, and how it can render time irrelevant. What Fincher has created is a film that succeeds on its own terms, flaws and all, leaving us with a sense that what we have seen, while not perfect, is something very special indeed.
Click here to read my full review.

5 comments:

nick plowman said...

Cannot wait! Been looking forward to this baby for quite some time.

Matthew Lucas said...

Hope it shows up in your neck of the woods soon, Nick! ;-)

Sam Juliano said...

Beautiful review in every sense of the word. I must say matthew that I pretty much agree with you on this one down the line. It does have a shot to finish near the bottom of my Top 10 list, but I'm not sure yet. the FORREST GUMP segment was indeed lamentable, and while I am as much in awe of Brad pitt's looks as anyone else, i think Fincher went too far with the close-ups. As we discussed in a previous post, Alexander Desplat's score was magnificent and the visuals were on-occasion surreal and intoxicating. It's a very, very good film, but is it a Top 10? Maybe, I'd say 50/50 at this point. I suspect you may be thinking in the same terms, but I could be wrong.

Sam Juliano said...

I have decided it belongs in the top ten. Let's just say the experience has grown on me. I hope we are on the same page here.

coffee said...

Cate Blanchett with a southern accent FTW; but Benjamin Button kept dragging on, always pausing dramatically on Brad Pitt's face, a lot like Meet Joe Black, FTL