Tuesday, February 20, 2007

Ménilmontant

Cinema is filled with hidden treasures and undiscovered gems that most moviegoers never get the chance to experience - like this 1926 silent short by Dimitri Kirsanoff. Ménilmontant tells the story of two country girls, who move to the city after the violent murder of their parents, and the trials that await them there. It is a hauntingly beautiful film - one of the most breathtaking ever made, in my opinion. And it is credited as famed film critic Pauline Kael's favorite film.

It's one of mine too, and is only available on the excellent DVD collection of avant-garde films from Kino Video. So since you can't just go down to your local blockbuster and rent it, and if you're just curious or only have a passing interest, here is a link to Stage 6, a website that specializes in experimental film, where you can view it in its entirety.

Click on the picture to view the film. It comes highly recommended.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

I am completely in love with this film, and most certainly agree with you that it is one of cinema's greatest masterpieces. I first saw it a year ago, when I was 14. I remember being struck by its haunting, ephemeral quality, and, (unusual for many modern editions of silent films, in my opinion) the score is lovely and fits perfectly.
Sincerely,
The Magpie Queen (Alissa R.)